BCLP Global Restructuring & Insolvency Developments

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U.S. Trustee Fees – one spreadsheet to rule them all…

Editor’s Note – This is a great and useful post.  Most importantly, these formulae work perfectly – your editor actually tried them out in his own spreadsheet.  For your next Debtor case, use this for your budgeting and there should be no surprises for US Trustee fees.  And if you have any trouble with this, call Jacob directly – he is a data-driven lawyer and also very interested in lending a hand to fellow restructuring professionals.

Recently I had to project quarterly U.S. Trustee fees in several jointly administered chapter 11 bankruptcy cases under the U.S. Trustee’s current fee guidelines (posted to effectuate 28 U.S.C. § 1930(a)(6)).  Fees are calculated based on each debtor’s “disbursements” in a given quarter.[1]  The calculation of multiple U.S. Trustee fees for multiple debtors can be challenging, particularly since the U.S. Trustee fees are calculated based on eight different brackets. 

A step forward – the FirstEnergy Solutions court comes to the commonsense conclusion that steel forges aren’t “forward contract merchants.”

Thomas Paine would be proud of this Court’s commonsense approach to the Bankruptcy Code

 

In the In re FirstEnergy Solutions Corporation bankruptcy cases,[1] the court recently issued an opinion narrowing the number of situations in which a fixed-price supply agreement (used to hedge against rising input costs and constituting a “forward contract” in bankruptcy parlance) will be treated as an exception to the general rules governing “executory contracts”[2] in chapter 11 bankruptcy cases.

The “automatic stay” under section 362 of the Bankruptcy Code usually prevents a contract counterparty from terminating an executory contract without first getting court approval (i.e., relief from the automatic stay); this is true even if the contract provides it may be terminated upon the filing of

The Primary Purpose Test and SRP Chameleon: How the Obamacare “Penalty” Became a “Tax” Only to Become a “Penalty” Again

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (a/k/a “Obamacare” or the “ACA”), with its infamous “individual mandate”[1] (and corresponding “shared responsibility payment” (which we’ll call the “SRP”)),[2] is no stranger to controversy.  Everyone is well aware of the legal challenges mounted against the individual mandate, and the seminal SCOTUS opinion upholding the mandate as a valid exercise of Congress’s taxing power – National Federation of Independent Business v. Sebelius, 567 U.S. 519 (2012). Don’t worry, we’re well aware that you, along with nearly every other American (including us here at the Bankruptcy Cave), are sick and tired of hearing about ACA squabbles.  But this post will explore one side of the ACA that you’ve almost certainly not considered, but which is interesting (to us at least).  It’s interesting because it provides the leading thought on which government exactions should and shouldn’t be

BC Healthcare Restructuring Update: R CSR’s O-U-T? Less U.S. Gov’t $$ = More 11s . . . ?

Ok, if your attention span is anything like ours, all this wonky stuff about the ins and outs of the Affordable Care Act (or “ObamaCare,” as most of us know it) causes your eyes to glaze over and makes your mind wander to simpler topics, like who will win Dancing with the Stars, whether the Will & Grace reboot can make it, or how Luke may soon be revealed as the most evil Jedi of all.

But trust us, faithful reader, and you can, in about three short minutes, become a whiz on last week’s latest change to ObamaCare, which we think will lead to a lot more healthcare-related restructuring activity. So here is the 411 on last week’s termination of ObamaCare’s so-called “CSR Subsidies,” and its impact on our precarious, bankruptcy-prone, healthcare marketplace.  All presented to you in easy-to-follow FAQs!

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